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Certificates in Construction Trades

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Earn a degree in construction trades from an accredited college

One of the best ways to prepare for a career in construction trades is through a college education. A Certificate will help you develop entry level skills, general construction trades know how and the basic construction trades experience you need to start your career off right. You may also consider a Bachelor's in Construction Trades to help you take your education and career to the next level. Please select construction trades school below.

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Why would I want a construction trades degree?

A degree in construction trades will give you the skills needed to work in one of America’s largest, and most lucrative, industries. There are also plenty of job opportunities for people who have the right credentials in construction. If you like to work with your hands and enjoy being outside, this may be the perfect field for you.

What do people with construction trade degrees do?

Construction trades is a broad, general degree. Some of the things that are studied in a construction trades program include how to plan and direct the completion of construction projects, the use of different tools and machines, construction law, and many other subjects. Due to this broad education, there are a number of different jobs that people with this degree do. Some of the most common jobs that people do after getting a construction trades degree are listed below.

  • Building Inspectors: Examine buildings, highways, streets, sewer and water systems, dams, bridges, and other structures to ensure that their construction, alteration, or repairs comply with zoning regulations, building codes, city ordinances, and contract specifications.
  • Cost Estimators: They forecast the cost, size, and duration of future projects of various businesses, particularly in construction. Business owners and managers use these estimations to make decisions on whether or not to move forward with projects, and how to bid out projects to make sure they are profitable.
  • Construction Managers: They plan, direct, and coordinate all kinds of building projects. Some of their duties include creating master plans, coordinating schedules, supervising sub-contractors, tracking cost overrides, devising reports, obtaining building permits, scheduling deliveries, monitoring progress, checking for compliance with building codes, and meeting with architects, owners, and engineers.
  • Masons: They build various structures using bricks, natural stone, and concrete blocks. Some of the most common structures they build include buildings, houses, fences, roads, walkways, and walls.
  • Carpenters: They build, install, and repair various structures and fixtures that are primarily made of wood and similar materials. These structures and fixtures may vary widely from bridges to kitchen cabinets.

How much to people in construction trades make?

Salaries in construction trades have a large variation. Some of the variables that determine the level of salaries include the trade, the size of the business (since many people in construction trades run their own business), and the number of hours worked. Below are median salaries for 5 of the most common trades that people with a construction trades degree go into. These figures were taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Building Inspectors: The median annual salary was $50,180 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $39,070 and $63,360. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $31,270, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $78,070.
  • Cost Estimators: The median annual salary was $56,510 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $42,720 and $74,320. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $33,150, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $94,470.
  • Construction Managers: The median annual salary was $79,860 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $60,650 and $107,140. The lowest paid 10 percent earned less than $47,000, and the highest paid 10 percent earned more than $145,920.
  • Masons: The median wage was $21.94 per hour in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $16.77 and $28.46 per hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13.26/hour, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $35.63/hour.
  • Carpenters: The median wage was $18.72 per hour in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $14.42 and $25.37 per hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $11.66/hour, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $33.34/hour.

How popular are construction trade jobs?

Construction trade jobs have always been popular, and they will continue to be popular into the foreseeable future. The job growth rate varies depending on the trade, but almost all construction trades will have either an average to above average growth rate through the year 2018. The growth rate ranges from about 12% to 25%.

How do I become a professional in construction trades?

Some trades can be learned through apprenticeship or on-the-job training, but others should be learned through a combination of training in the classroom and from experience on the job. No matter which trade you are thinking about going into, you could benefit from formal, in-class training. One of the best degrees for people aspiring to have a career in construction is a construction trades degree, since it gives you a good education on a broad spectrum of subjects related to construction and its various trades.

Salary and career outlook data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Construction Trades Schools (1)

South Texas Vocational Training Institute Request Info >

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